Greiser’s to Host Duvian Montoya Art Reception & Exhibit in March

The artwork of Easton-based painter and muralist Duvian Montoya can be found in public spaces in New Haven and throughout Norwalk, on permanent display at the SONO Collection, and among the art collections of Disney, the Albuquerque real estate corporation Gulfstream Worldwide, The Mattatuck Museum in Waterbury, and Housatonic Community College.

So, Greiser’s is thrilled to announce an upcoming exhibit of a small selection of work by our acclaimed friend and customer. About a dozen of Montoya’s paintings will be on display and for sale at Greiser’s from March 22 through April 30, 2022. An opening reception on Tuesday, March 22, from 6:30pm – 9:00pm is open to the public.

Montoya’s portraits of his family and Team Greiser’s were among his “Longing for Connection” pandemic series.

A Norwalk native, Montoya studied fine art at the School of Visual Arts in Manhattan. After graduation, he restored antique lithographs for museums, galleries and collectors around the world; studied the Old Masters’ techniques in Europe; and established a gallery exhibiting New Mexican contemporary artists in Santa Fe before returning to Connecticut. After spending five years converting an historic Georgian-style mansion in Norwalk into the St. Phillip’s Artist Guild gallery and studio space, he moved with his wife Emma Montoya to Easton in 2011.

Presently, he is serving as Artistic and Educational Director at The Norwalk Art Space, which offers free art education to underserved high school students and a premier space for regional artist exhibitions and programs.

Montoya’s philosophy is to paint the stories of our present lives the way our ancestors did in caves 10,000 years ago for future generations to build on.

“By studying our visual history, we can see our evolution and strive for a better tomorrow through a sophisticated visual language,” Montoya says. His gallery work and public installations give context to humanity’s current struggles, achievements, and aspirations. This is especially true of a mural project at the South Norwalk Train Station where he used the language of fashion to represent decades of transitory history in Norwalk and a mural at the Norwalk Public Library that shares Montoya’s parents’ story of migration from Colombia, South America, to Norwalk by using architecture and design as his visual transitions from country to country.

Montoya says he most enjoys creating a narrative that connects generations of people through symbols, color, texture, and shared visual cues. His recent work has spoken to the need for human connection in a time of social distancing and isolation. Other works depict individual meditative moments, architecture and its function as a cultural reference to its people and place, and the need to stand united against injustice toward our black and brown brothers and sisters.

Lee Skalkos: Landscapes in Pastel & Oil

Framed works on exhibit and for sale at Greiser’s thru December 31

Wonderland in Acadia, pastel by Lee Skalkos

On view November 1 – December 31 at Greiser’s are 26 framed landscapes by the talented local artist and art teacher Lee Skalkos.

Lee Skalkos is a pastel artist, metalsmith, and certified art teacher in the state of Connecticut. She has been teaching art for 17 years. Lee has lifelong experience with metals and has recently found an incredible passion for soft pastels. She visits Maine, Montana and Wyoming often to explore our National Parks and to share her experience of them with her students. 

“As a teacher,” Lee says, “I know that before I teach a subject, I need to teach my students who I am and to share my love of art with them. It’s important to me to be aware of how I think of and represent myself: I don’t wish to be viewed as an art expert of person who definitively knows whether a work of art is ‘good’ or not. Instead, I consider myself a skilled and enthusiastic teacher who promotes students’ critical thinking and creations.”

Lee says she believes that art education should focus on children’s ideas. “Their their experiences must be valued and built upon. Then art lessons can be not just successful, but also relevant.” 

All artwork is framed and prices range from $95 to $2,000 with most priced under $300.

POSTPONED Pete Bergeron: Timeless Tiny Oil Paintings

Snows Farm, by Pete Bergeron

Thursday, June 4, 2020, 6:00-8:00PM.
Meet Redding fine artist Pete Bergeron at the opening of our exhibit of a dozen of his smallest (5″x7″) oil paintings.

Pete has been painting ever since being inspired in early childhood by the classic television instruction series “You Are an Artist” hosted by Jon Gnagy.

His formal art training began at Paier School of Art in Hamden, Conn., where he studied illustration. Eventually he turned to large scale painting and, like artist James Rosenquist before him, he worked as a billboard painter creating giant images of hamburgers, beer bottles, cars and other colorful oversized advertisements.

In 1990 he studied with Frank Covino of Waitsfield, Vermont, to learn the Classical Academic approach to painting: a systematic method that begins with a detailed monochromatic under-painting superimposed with many layers of thinly applied colored glazes. The resulting effect gives an overall luminous quality to the finished painting. His commitment to fine art was a natural direction that led to a consuming full-time passion for creating lasting and timeless works of art.

Pete’s current landscape paintings are reminiscent of the late nineteenth century American landscape painters of the Hudson River School — including John Frederick Kensett, Sanford Robinson Gifford, and William Trost Richards — and of the Tonalist painters of that period. His work hangs in many collections throughout New England and other areas of the U.S.